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  • 02 May 2017 6:00 AM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    We can all get off track and lapse into unhealthy habits, especially if we are dedicated to our mission. “Operating under the strain of insufficient resources and motivated by a strong sense of moral urgency, they can find it difficult to limit their work hours, take breaks, and tune out their emails while at home.” says Rebecca Koenig.

    I think what happens with nonprofits in particular, we are empowered by a mission, we are passionate about the work we do, and we don’t want to do anything less than our very best.
    Tara Collins, Rupco
    Director of Communications and Resource Development


    8 Tips for Staying Healthy While Doing Good
    These tips are simple, but powerful. Read each one and honestly assess yourself. Make a commitment to implement changes for your health and happiness.
    1. Be Realistic Keep your work in perspective. Remember that you cannot do it all, all the time. Don't let yourself lapse into becoming a martyr.
    2. Strive for Balance We all work extra hours on occasion. Make it an exception, not the rule. Discuss comp time for situations where extra effort is required, and make sure you take it. Otherwise, you're setting yourself up for burnout.
    3. Organize and Prioritize Plan and prioritize your responsibilities at the beginning of each day, week, and month. Be proactive not reactive. Know the most important task for the day and start with it versus answering emails. Keep your three most important monthly tasks in movement everyday.
    4. ‘Not Right Now’ If you have a pressing issue, learn to say ‘not right now’ when the next request crosses your desk. Be specific and reschedule the deadline for a later time and/or day. For tight deadlines that require concentration, put a do not disturbsign on your door.
    5. Reduce Distractions Reduce distractions to improve your productivity during the workday and decrease the need to work extra hours. If possible, set aside one day a week with no meetings, so you can focus on work and get a lot done.
    6. Set a Good Example As a leader, you can create the open environment for others to share when they are becoming overwhelmed. Work as a team to adress unique stresses. By managing your stress well, you lead by example.
    7. Take Breaks Know your limits and when to recharge. A break for lunch or a walk can help refocus your mind for greater productivity.
    8. Remember the Mission Never forget the larger calling of your organization. It's the people we help, and during stressful days, it can be easy to forget the good we do in the world.
    You know taking time to relax or do other things is important, but it’s hard when you have so many things you want to get done and don’t want to let anyone down.”
    Maggie Siemer, Girls on the Run
    Operations Director
  • 21 Apr 2017 3:16 PM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    A new 10-year study from a leadership advisory firm and economists from two business schools, published in this month's Harvard Business Review, finds that the most successful chief executives often don't fit the mold of an extroverted, charismatic, confident executive who climbed a mistake-free ladder to the top with a degree from an elite school.

    The biggest aha, overall, is that some of the things that make CEOs attractive to the board have no bearing on their performance. Like most human beings, they get seduced by charismatic, polished presenters. They simply do better in interviews. There was zero correlation between pedigree and ultimate performance.
    Elena Lytkina Botelho
    Partner at ghSmart
    Founder, CEO Genome Project
    Author, The CEO Next Door

    Surprising traits of top-performing executives
    The CEO Genome Project assessed the early moves of CEOs with outstanding track records; some valuable lessons for leadership transitions emerged. The top four behaviors sound deceptively simple. But the key is to practice them with maniacal consistency, which our work reveals is a great challenge for many leaders.
    1. Deciding with speed and conviction. High-performing CEOs do not necessarily stand out for making great decisions all the time; rather, they stand out for being more decisive. They make decisions earlier, faster, and with greater conviction. They do so consistently—even amid ambiguity, with incomplete information, and in unfamiliar domains. People who were described as “decisive” were 12 times more likely to be high-performing CEOs. Smart but slow decision makers become bottlenecks, and their teams either grow frustrated (which can lead to the attrition of valuable talent) or become overcautious themselves, stalling the entire enterprise. Among CEOs who were fired over issues related to decision making, only one-third lost their jobs because they’d made bad calls; the rest were ousted for being indecisive.
    2. Engaging for impact. Strong performers balance keen insight into their stakeholders’ priorities with an unrelenting focus on delivering business results. They start by developing an astute understanding of their stakeholders’ needs and motivations, and then get people on board by driving for performance and aligning them around the goal of value creation. CEOs who deftly engaged stakeholders with this results orientation were 75% more successful in the role.Three-quarters of the strong CEO candidates demonstrate calm under pressure. Two-thirds of the CEOs who excelled at engagement were rated as strong in conflict management. They do not invest their energy in being liked or protecting their teams from painful decisions. They give everyone a voice but not a vote. They listen and solicit views but do not default to consensus-driven decision making.
    3. Adapting proactively. CEOs who excel at adapting are 6.7 times more likely to succeed. Adaptable CEOs spent significantly more of their time—as much as 50%—thinking about the long term. They sense change earlier and make strategic moves to take advantage of it. Adaptable CEOs also recognize that setbacks are an integral part of changing course and treat their mistakes as opportunities to learn and grow. 90% of the strong CEO candidates scored high on dealing with setbacks.
    4. Delivering reliably. Mundane as it may sound, the ability to reliably produce results was possibly the most powerful of the four essential CEO behaviors. In our sample, CEO candidates who scored high on reliability were twice as likely to be picked for the role and 15 times more likely to succeed in it. Boards and investors love a steady hand, and employees trust predictable leaders. A stunning 94% of the strong CEO candidates score high on consistently following through on their commitments.
    If you’re good at course correcting, being wrong may be less costly than you think, whereas being slow is going to be expensive for sure.”
    Jeff Bezos
    Amazon CEO

  • 05 Apr 2017 3:09 PM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    “Financial need makes it difficult for leaders to turn down money for programs, even if those programs are not a good fit. If proposed federal budget cuts come to pass in 2017, that pull may become even stronger.” says Rebecca Koenig in her recent article in The Chronical of Philanthropy.

    Nonprofits are already bracing for sweeping reductions in a lot of their programs. As the government retracts or retreats from providing the amount of social services people need, I think a lot of governments are going to be relying on nonprofits to fill the void.
    Larry Checco, Nonprofit consultant
     
    Five Tips for Nonprofit Leaders to Avoid ‘Mission Creep’
    How can you stay true to your organization’s mission and focused on your main objectives? 
    1. Make a mission statement and a strategic plan. A clear, strong mission statement is the best way to stay on target.
    2. Make your mission clear to supporters. Marketing your mission accurately can help bring in money for programs you’re qualified to run. If your marketing doesn’t match your mission, you may need to revise how you sell your organization.
    3. Run new ideas past a team of leaders. Frequently checking ideas with organization leaders, such as the executive team or the governing board, will help your nonprofit stay on track. Other groups can help, too.
    4. Seek new, mission-appropriate revenue opportunities. Bringing in money that matches your mission requires your nonprofit to make its expertise visible to potential partners and consumers
    5. Suggest other outlets to help. But just because your nonprofit can’t serve someone doesn’t mean that you can’t help at all. Be available to offer options.
    In the nonprofit world, you only have one chance to have success with a program. If the outcomes are not good, that reflects on your organization. Taking money for things you’re not equipped to do turns into something negative.
    Sofia Crisp
    Executive Director of Housing Consultants Group

     
  • 20 Mar 2017 11:58 AM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    Happiness the world over 
    Today is International Happiness Day. How happy are you? The World Happiness Report, released today at the UN, now includes an entire section on Happiness at Work.

    Increasingly, happiness is considered to be the proper measure of social progress and the goal of public policy. 
    World Happiness Report, 2017
     
    Four things that nonprofits can do to create a thriving work environment
    Why are nonprofit employees unhappy? Because they work in environments that, and for bosses and with colleagues, who squelch “happiness.” (See Creating Sustainable Performance)These are free and practical suggestions:
    1. Give employees the discretion to make decisions. Too tight a rein and you dampen vitality.  Uncomfortable with this seemingly open-ended invitation? There are tools for that!
    2. Share information throughout your organization, rather than dispensing it as if were something that needed to be earned to know.
    3. Love this one:  “minimize incivility.” Truly, did we need scholars to tell us that working in an uncivil workplace isn’t a recipe for happy workers?
    4. Provide performance feedback. Not the stuff formal stuff that comes with paperwork and formal meetings and is all too frequently, and wrongly, tied to compensation, but the small stuff, the good stuff—and the bad.
    Four thing you can do to increase your own happiness
    Be conscious about your own happiness list. If you don't have one, start here:
    1. Take breaks for renewal. Not talking long, but long enough to break out of the mire, breath and come back a bit refreshed.  So, take a stroll, meditate, read something relaxing, do a crossword.
    2. Take it into your own hands to make your work more meaningful; don’t sit around waiting for something to fall into your lap.
    3. Look for and seize those learning, growth opportunities. Even in flat, small nonprofits, there are opportunities to step out of your comfort zone and do something different.
    4. Stick with satisfying, energizing relationships at work; ditch the ones that take you down.
    Daniele Quercia: Happy maps
    You may enjoy this wonderful video about taking the happy route. Another easy way to choose happiness over expediency.
    https://www.ted.com/talks/daniele_quercia_happy_maps
  • 16 Feb 2017 11:25 AM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    We are all keenly aware of the current and very real unpredictability in our current political climate. Peter Fishinger covers six important areas of concern in his article "Advice for Nonprofit Leaders: How to Navigate an Unpredictable Political Landscape."

    • Watch the economy first and tax policy second. Looking ahead, many analysis groups predict economic growth for 2017 and 2018, albeit at a lower rate than in previous years. The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center posits that if fully implemented, these (Trumps's) proposals could decrease giving by 4.5 to 9 percent.
    • Let politics inform your work, but not define it.  Find a way to harness this mindset by analyzing how new political leadership and trending activist movements motivate people. Organizations in some sectors are already showing success in responding to political changes. These include women's health, environmental, international, and social justice nonprofits.
    • Position your organization to adapt to sector-sweeping changes, especially in healthcare. Backup plans for disruptions in government funding, the tax structure, or a recession can prepare organizations to weather challenges and take advantage of new opportunities. Nonprofits need to think critically about resources and partnerships that are most critical to sustaining and advancing their missions.
    • If there is another recession, leverage close donor relationships. People tend to reduce the number of organizations they support before they reduce the amount they give to their top organizations. If donors believe in an organization’s mission, they will be more willing to stay connected and support it through thick and thin.
    • Speak up for the value of the nonprofit sector at all levels of government. Though the charitable deduction has previously earned bipartisan support, maintaining that support will take the efforts of the entire sector, and all nonprofits should communicate why this deduction matters.
    • Stay committed. Nonprofits can thrive under any administration. History suggests that the organizations that are effective and committed can survive and thrive under any administration.

    Times of unpredictability can increase stress levels. The Leadership Sanctuary's mission has been to support nonprofit leaders to be more resilient, develop focusing practices and build supportive community. We urge you to stay informed, continue rigorous self-care and stay connected. Let us know what is helping you through these unpredictable times.

  • 03 Feb 2017 11:27 AM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    Generous givers are a must for a thriving organization. How can we nurture this trait and avoid burnout? In Adam Grant and Reb Rebelle’s article Beat Generosity Burnout, they outline in detail with fascinating research, how selflessness can lead to exhaustion, but being thoughtful about about how you help, when you help, and whom you help results productive giving and a meaningful happy life. The following are excerpts from their article and research. If you have a few extra minutes to read the full article, you will be encouraged and clearer about how to manage your own giving.

    “Research shows that across industries the people who make the most sustainable contributions to organizations — those who offer the most direct support, take the most initiative, and make the best suggestions — protect their time so that they can work on their own goals too. Being an effective giver isn’t about dropping everything every time for every person. It’s about making sure that the benefits of helping others outweigh the costs to you. Finding ways to give without depleting your time and energy. Reactive helping is exhausting, but proactive giving can be energizing. 

    These are the 7 Habits of Highly Effective Givers:

    • Prioritize the help requests that come your way — say yes when it matters most and no when you need to.
    • Give in ways that play to your interests and strengths to preserve your energy and provide greater value.
    • Distribute the giving load more evenly — refer requests to others when you don’t have the time or skills, and be careful not to reinforce gender biases about who helps and how.
    • Secure your oxygen mask first — you’ll help others more effectively if you don’t neglect your own needs.
    • Amplify your impact by looking for ways to help multiple people with a single act of generosity.
    • Chunk your giving into dedicated days or blocks of time rather than sprinkling it throughout the week. You’ll be more effective — and more focused.
    • Learn to spot takers, and steer clear of them. They’re a drain on your energy, not to mention a performance hazard.

    We all can be more thoughtful about how we help. Building on a nationally representative poll of Americans, we’ve found six profiles of giving:

    • Experts share knowledge.
    • Coaches teach skills.
    • Mentors give advice and guidance.
    • Connectors make introductions.
    • Extra-milers show up early, stay late, and volunteer for extra work.
    • Helpers provide hands-on task support and emotional support.

    The bad news is that givers are vulnerable to takers. They tend to trust too readily and see the best in everyone. But that can actually make them better lie detectors, research shows. Because they trust others, they are lied to more often. Givers get to see the full spectrum of human behavior. If they pay close attention, they can learn to recognize the clues that reveal selfishness:

    • Acting entitled to people’s help.
    • Claiming credit for success while blaming others for failure.
    • Kissing up and kicking down.
    • Being nice to your face and then stabbing you in the back — or being nice only when seeking a favor.
    • Overpromising and underdelivering.

    As David Aikman at the World Economic Forum puts it, “There are talker-takers and giver-doers.” 

  • 17 Jan 2017 11:28 AM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    We are going to have to be on our toes in the upcoming year. The changing political climate is putting funding in jeopardy—expect federal legislative and regulatory changes to affect the nonprofit sector. Time to speak up, be seen, and get our voices heard.

    Tim Delaney and David L. Thompson, of the National Council of Nonprofits, offer some practical next steps in a recently published article, Nonprofits Need to Stand Together to Push for Smart Public Policies. They suggest:

    • Fight back against cuts in spending that would hurt the public.
    • Expand, don’t limit, tax laws that encourage giving.
    • Engage in the debate on the Affordable Care Act.
    • Respect the legal independence of nonprofits to allocate their own resources.
    • Keep partisan politics far away from charitable organizations and foundations.
    • Simplify federal rules and contracts.

    There's a lot to do, but don't forget to take care of yourself. You can practice mindfulness in as little as 15 minutes.

  • 15 Dec 2016 6:00 AM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    In this hectic time of year when it can be hard to catch your breath or find space to accomplish all that's on your to do list; it might feel impossible to find some sanctuary. Can fit in five minutes of mindfulness? Start your day with a short simple period of mindful breathing. Don’t have five minutes? Try this three minutes meditation.

    What else can you do to ENJOY the holidays? Think ahead, be flexible, don’t overdo, be mindful of your intake, forgive yourself, stay grateful, do what you love! That’s one appraoch—what is yours? What strategy will suit your life-style, your family and bring your the most joy?

  • 09 Aug 2016 11:18 AM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    Do you ever wish you could slow your mind down? Are you juggling too many thoughts or can’t get to sleep? Try the Square Breathing Technique! This is a simple, easy, effective way to relieve stress and refocus your attention.
     

     
    You can do this with eyes open or closed:

    • Find a square or rectangular object near you; a picture frame, a door, table top, sidewalk square, fence, etc. Or picture a square in your mind’s eye.
    • Move your eye from the top left corner of your box to the right corner, inhaling to the count of four.
    • Move your eye from the top right corner to the bottom right corner holding your breath to the count of four.
    • Move your eye from the bottom right corner to the bottom left corner, exhaling to the count of four.
    • Move your eye from the bottom left corner to the top left corner, holding your breath to the count of four.
    • Keep moving your eyes along the square as your slow your breathing.
    • Breathe around the square for two to five minutes.
    • If you wish, you may change the direction of your eye movement to counter clockwise.
    • For added benefit add a statement of gratitude to each movement.
  • 14 Jun 2016 4:08 PM | Heather Kaye (Administrator)

    You’ve had a pressing dilemma, asked for input from colleagues and peers, and posed the question to the universe. Are you taking the time in quiet reflection to hear the answer? It is helpful when deep listening is needed, to take time and make space for silence. This sounds simple, but many people avoid silence. There is no substitute for creating an environment of receptivity than a restful, undemanding session of quiet. Take as little or as much time as you need.
     
    In silence:

    • Sit. Get grounded and settle in a comfortable position.
    • Relax the body. Start with a moment of gratitude. Are you able to feel a sense of lightheartedness?
    • Allow your perspective to shift to the issue at hand. Be in the question—what is the path to a solution?
    • Notice any blocks or obstacles. Do not resist, just notice.
    • Allow your heart and mind to be open to new ideas and inspiration.
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